The Journal of Bucharest College of Physicians and the Romanian Academy of Medical Sciences

Elvira Bratila

Elvira Bratila

A Study of the Sensitivity and Specificity of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technique used in the Diagnosis of Endometriosis versus the Intraoperative Appearance Considered the Reference Standard in the Diagnosis of Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a gynecological pathology with chronic symptoms, which negatively affects the patient’s quality of life1. The prevalence of endometriosis in asymptomatic women is between 2% and 50%, depending on the populations studied and the method of diagnosis. The severity of the symptoms as well as the probability of diagnosing endometriosis increases with age9. Because endometriosis is a gynecological condition with a non-specific clinical picture, sometimes even asymptomatic, imaging technology can be considered the first line of diagnosis for this pathology. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used in the diagnosis of endometriotic lesions depending on their location, and compare the results obtained with the intraoperative appearance considered a reference standard in the diagnosis of endometriosis. Our study revealed the highest specificity for MRI in the case of endometriotic bladder invasion, respectively the highest sensitivity for endometriotic rectal nodules.

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Endometriosis-Associated Infertility

Endometriosis is definined as the presence of endometrial-like tissue outside the uterine cavity and it presumably affects 10-15% of reproductive aged women. The prevalence of endometriosis appears to be higher in women in Philippines, Indian, Japanese and Korean origin[1]. Clinical manifestations depend upon the site where the ectopic endometrial tissue is located and include dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, chronic pelvic pain, infertility, but the possibility of being asymptomatic exists. [...]

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Methods of Transvaginal Ultrasound Examination in Endometriosis

"Endometriosis is a chronic, hormone-dependent condition with a nonspecific clinical picture, including chronic pelvic pain, a disturbing symptom that causes the patient to seek specialist medical advice"[1]. It is a chronic, often progressive, condition that affects women of reproductive age in a proportion of 5-10%. Despite such high prevalence, endometriosis remains an enigmatic disease with a poorly understood pathophysiology. [...]

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Prenatal Diagnosis and Genetic Counselling in Turner Syndrome: Case Report and Literature Review

The first paper describing female patients with Turner syndrome (TS) was published in 1938 by Henry Turner[1]. It was later discovered that in 1930, Otto Ullrich had already reported a case report of a girl with suggestive symptoms of TS[2]. Therefore, the complete name is Ullrich-Turner syndrome.
Turner’s syndrome is a pathology found only in females, characterized by the partial or total absence of a second sex chromosome which leads to a wide range of physical findings that often includes congenital lymphedema, short stature, and gonadal dysgenesis[1]. The physical symptoms depend on the karyotype, as only 50% of Turner patients are 45,X the others displaying mosaics or abnormalities in the second sex chromosome. [...]

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