The Journal of Bucharest College of Physicians and the Romanian Academy of Medical Sciences

Elena Popescu

Elena Popescu

Oral Pathology in Digestive Diseases

Correlations between alterations in the oral cavity and systemic conditions have been widely reported. A considerable number of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases of varied nature may produce lesions in the hard and soft oral tissues. Among the different types of manifestations of GI, oral lesions represent an important, if not a major component of the manifestation of these diseases. As a consequence, recognition and management of oral lesions accompanying the GI conditions, is mandatory for all clinicians, either gastroenterologists or dentists. The aim of this article is to underline useful data about the most common GI conditions (intestinal bowel diseases (IBD), gastroesophageal reflux, genetic diseases, malabsorption conditions, infections, metastatic tumors) and their link to oral pathology.

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Telemedicine in Europe - Current Status and Future Perspectives

Telemedicine ensures remote medical services through technologies that facilitate the interaction between a health professional and patients and offers the possibility of a interdiciplinary consultation between specialists, in order to obtain a diagnosis and treatment plan. It involves secure transmission of medical data and information, through text, sound, images or other forms needed for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients. With the help of telemedicine, people from rural areas, with dificult access to primary care, and those with reduced mobility can benefit from healthcare services. This paper is a review of the latest data available in the literature regarding telemedicine and the future prespectives in this field in Europe.

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Trace Elements and Cancer

The role of the trace elements in humans has increased during the last 20 years. It seems that they play a significant role in maintaining the healthy state of the organism. These minerals are present in small levels, but their role is vital. Although they account for only 0.02% of the total body weight, it has highlighted that they play significant roles, either as active centers of enzymes or as trace bioactive substances. Their excess or deficiency may influence the homeostasis and potentially can lead to several chronic diseases, including cancer. It is already known that certain elements in the free or combined state can be primary causative agents, or risk factors for human cancer. Nevertheless, it is important to underline that the carcinogenic elements are fewer than it was expected in studies. Copper, cobalt, chromium, zinc, selenium, are involved in many biochemical processes supporting life. However, their concentrations may play an important role in developing cancer, by influencing proliferation or apoptosis. Disruption of the balance between free radicals and antioxidants may cause a cellular damage and trigger carcinogenesis.

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