Cornelia Nitipir

Cornelia Nitipir

Intravascular Papillary Endothelial Hyperplasia - Case Report

Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH), first described by Pierre Masson in 1923 is an uncommon benign vascular lesion that involves the skin or the soft tissue[1]. IPEH represents 2-4% of vascular tumors arising in the skin and soft tissue[2]. It usually occurs in the fourth decade of life and has a slight predilection for the female gender[3]. [...]

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Important Aspects to Take Into Consideration When Administering Cytotoxic Chemotherapy. A Review

In the last decade, huge efforts have been made to optimize and personalize oncological treatment. Many novel therapies and better combinations of older ones have been implemented. Even if novelty is always exciting, one has take into consideration that the way a drug is administered is as important as the drug itself. The present review focuses on how the administration of several cancer drugs can minimize the toxicity they induce. It stresses that if enough importance is given to this aspect, patients can tolerate effective doses of treatment with better outcomes and have better quality of life. [...]

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Atypical Lipomatous Tumor/Well Differentiated Liposarcoma: a Borderline Malignancy Tumor

Adipocytic tumors represent the largest single group of mesenchymal tumors, due to the high prevalence of lipomas and angiolipomas. Liposarcomas are histologically divided into five subtypes: myxoid, pleomorphic, dedifferentiated, round cell and atypical lipomatous tumor (well-differentiated liposarcoma). Atypical li-pomatous tumor (ALT) is the most common histological subgroup, they account for 40% to 45% of all liposarcomas. Well-diff erentiated (WD) liposarco-mas are locally aggressive but incapable of metastasis. Approximately 75% develop in the deep soft tissue of the limbs, followed by 20% in the retroperitoneum and a much smaller percentage in the inguinal region and the mediastinum. They are usually diagnosed after the fifth decade of life, with a slight male predominance re-ported. Atypical lipomatous tumor is an intermediate (locally aggressive) neoplasm composed either entirely or in part of a mature adipocytic proliferation showing significant variation in cell size, atypical stromal cells and a limited number of scattered monovacuolated or multivacuolated lipoblasts. [...]

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Controversies and challenges of chronic wound infection diagnosis and treatment

Over the last decade, chronic wounds such as venous or arterial ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pressure sores, and non-healing surgical wounds were brought into the spotlight of the medical community, due to their increasing prevalence and to their significant economic burden (1). In developed countries billions of dolars are spent each year (2,3) for the repeated hospitalizations and expensive treatment of patients suffering from non-healing ulcers. The persistent pain, either spontaneous or induced by treatment (4), the malodour of the ulceration (5), the mobility restrictions (6), and the excessive exudate, significantly impair the patients` quality of life, who might also experience secondary mood disorders (50-75%) (6) or sleep disorders (69%) (7).
The persistent bacterial colonization of the wound, as well as the longterm use of antibiotics predispose to the development of nosocomial infections with resistant strains such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) producing micro organisms, and multiple antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa(8).

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Response to Chemotherapy of Paraneoplastic Erythroderma in a Patient with Ovarian Cancer

Erythroderma is an uncommon potentially fatal skin disorder first described by Hebra in 1868. Erythroderma is a definitive term that refers to generalized erythema and desquamation affecting 90% of the body surface. It usually occurs in individuals older than 40, except when the subjacent disease is atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis or hereditary ichthyosis [1,2]. Erythroderma represents a reaction pattern, a maximal form of skin irritation that may be secondary to certain cutaneous diseases, drug reactions, infections, solid or hematological malignancies, and other conditions. In the absence of a suggestive history, the clinical and histopatho logic distinction between the underlying causes is often problematic and determining the specific etiology is very challenging, an important proportion of cases being classified as idiopathic erythroderma.

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An Unusual Presentation of Primary Cutaneous Aggressive Epidermotropic CD8+ T Cell Lymphoma

Primary cutaneous aggressive epidermotropic CD8+ T cell lymphoma is an extremely rare type of cytotoxic lymphoma reported for the first time by Berti et al. in 1999, (1) who described the tumor as a distinct clinico-pathologic entity with an aggressive clinical course. It presents as widespread, rapidly evolving papules, plaques, and tumors, often showing central necrosis and ulceration, histologically characterized by epidermotropism of CD8+ CD4- T cells. The condition has an increased tendency of spreading to extranodal sites, usually responds poorly to conventional therapies for classic CD4+ cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs), and has an unfavorable prognosis. (1-4)

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